Emory celebrates Black History Month | Emory University

Here is the current schedule of Black History Month activities. 

Monday, Feb. 7

12 p.m.

Gospel Music in the Soul and Hip-Hop Eras

Registration required

Claudrena Harold, professor of African American and African Studies and history at the University of Virginia, will look at five towering gospel artists — Shirley Caesar, Andrae Crouch, the Winans, the Clark Sisters and Kirk Franklin — and how their work opened space for new conversations on race, the relationship between religiosity and blackness, and politics. 

Wednesday, Feb. 9

12 p.m.

Mid-Week Musical Meditation

Registration required

All are invited to reflect and decompress in a mid-week, mid-day time of sacred music. Join Maury Allums, director of music, and the Emory University Office of Spiritual and Religious Life in taking a moment to breathe and connect with others in our community.

Thursday, Feb. 10

6 p.m.

Black-Asian Solidarity

Registration required

Join the James Weldon Johnson Institute as it hosts a wide-ranging discussion with a diverse group of scholars who seek to answer questions related to the experiences of both Blacks and Asian Americans (both separately and in relation to each other), where these groups find common ground and the stressors that strain alliances.

Monday, Feb. 14

12 p.m.

Finding Freedom: “Back to Africa” Movements and Black Emigration

Registration required

Niambi Carter, associate professor of political science at Howard University, will explore how Black people use movement as political strategy and how this may help us reconsider, not only back-to-Africa movements, but how Black Americans are considered in past and contemporary conversations of emigration.

Tuesday, Feb. 15

5:30 p.m.

Love Noir: A Conversation about Black Love

Alumni Memorial University Center, Room 106

Join the Office for Racial and Cultural Engagement and the Emory Black Student Union for an interactive conversation about Black love.

Wednesday, Feb. 16

4 p.m.

Book Launch: “You Truly Assumed

Registration required

Emory undergraduate Laila Sabreen’s debut novel chronicles the stories of three Black Muslim teenage girls as they navigate Islamophobia and grow as activists together through their blog. Sabreen will join Margari Hill, executive director of the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative, to discuss Black Muslim women’s experiences, literature and representation in young adult fiction.

Wednesday, Feb. 16

5 p.m.

In Our Hands: Improving Health Outcomes for Black Mothers and Infants

Registration required 

In the 18th annual Hamilton E. Holmes Lecture, Cherie Hill, assistant professor in gynecology and obstetrics in the Emory School of Medicine, will moderate a panel of health care leaders and advocates about what health care providers can do to change to grim statistics facing Black mothers.

Monday, Feb. 21

12 p.m.
Our Good Fortune: A History of Black Banking in the American South

Registration required 

Brandon Windford, associate professor of history at the University of Tennessee – Knoxville, discusses the social, political and economic history of Black banks in the region with rich details about the men and women bankers responsible for their existence. These financial institutions represented the possibilities and strivings of Black people and contributed to a thriving separate Black economy.

Monday, Feb. 21

2:30 p.m.

Narrative as Scientific Evidence: Identifying Black Humanities in the Study and Return of Anatomical Others

Anthropology Building, Room 303 

Rachel Watkins, a biocultural anthropologist at American University with an emphasis on African American biohistory and social history, looks at relationships between health, disease and social location in people whose remains are in the W. Montague Cobb anatomical collection and interred at the New York African Burial Ground.

Tuesday, Feb. 22

5 p.m.

Anti-Antiracism: Fighting Backlash, Building Justice

Tull Auditorium in Gambrell Hall (also livestreamed)

Registration required 

Darren Hutchinson, Emory Law professor and inaugural John Lewis Chair for Civil Rights and Social Justice, will deliver the 2022 Emory Law Martin Luther King Jr. Day lecture.

Wednesday, Feb. 23

4 p.m.

2022 Pellom McDaniels Sports History Lecture

Registration required

Elle Duncan, ESPN SportsCenter anchor, will provide this lecture designed to foster a conversation around race, sports and African American history. Named in honor of the late Pellom McDaniels III, curator of the African American collections at Emory’s Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library, the program seeks to showcase the library’s African Americans in Sports holdings.

Wednesday, Feb. 23

4:15 p.m.

A talk with renowned artist Glenn Ligon

Registration required

New York artist Glenn Ligon has pursued an incisive exploration of American history, literature and society across bodies of work that build critically on the legacies of modern painting and conceptual art. This talk is part of the Race, Social Justice and Contemporary African-American Art Series, sponsored by the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, The James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference and the Department of Art History.

Thursday, Feb. 24

12 p.m.

Constructive Collisions

Lawrence P. and Ann Estes Klamon Room, Claudia Nance Rollins Building

Registration required; closes Feb. 15 

This second Constructive Collisions session will be an in-person, on-campus event that will continue to connect researchers working at the intersection of race, equity, resilience and social justice. This session will host Lightning Talk presenters who will share brief 10-minute presentations on their ongoing work and future research interests. Following Lighting Talks, the Office of the Senior Vice President for Research will host a pitch session where event attendees will network, collaborate and brainstorm project ideas that can lead to extramural funding. The event will culminate with each team pitching a real seed project, with up to two teams receiving small, on-the-spot funding to support new collaborations. 

Monday, Feb. 28

12 p.m.

Relocation and Realignment: The Political Impact of Black Migration and Politics

Registration required 

Keneshia Grant, associate professor of political science at Howard University, will describe the ways that Black migration has impacted American society and politics.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here